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. many governments have yet to s pass laws enforcing the protocol. the participants are expected to discuss how to secure funding to meet the targets agreed. >>> military personnel from the united states and philippines have begun 11 days of joint exercises. the the drills began monday on the western coast m facing the south china sea. 3800 personnel are taking part in this year's exercises. that's 800 more than last year. a philippine know military suggest they reflect the numbers growing in the region. u the philippines is engaged in disputes with china. chinese patrol boats are preventing philippine fishing boats from approaching. u.s. leaders have expressed concern that china is expanding its activities in the region. >>> australian prime minister has urged japan to sign a free trade agreement with her country as soon as possible. she says no other fta will be more logical. he spoke at a reception in sydney. >> japan is a critically important economic partner for austr australia and will remain so in the future but in a dynamic and changing region it's time to take the next s
as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
and 10% of coastal and marine areas by 2020. but many governments have yet to pass laws enforcing the protocol. some developing countries say they can't afford to implement the policies. the apartments participants are into it. >>> have begun 11 days of joint exercises. the drills are taking place near islands at the center of a territorial dispute between china and the philippines. the drills began monday on the western coast of luzon island facing the south china sea. 3,800 personnel are taking part in this year's exercises. that's 800 more than last year. a filipino military leader suggested the numbers reflect a growing security threat in the region. >> and i'm confident that they shall result in the partnership that is enduring that we shall be prepared to face the present and emerging maritime challenges in this part of the region. >> the philippines is engaged in territorial disputes with china over the islands. chinese patrol boats are preventing philippine boats from reaching the shore. >>> australian prime minister hatz urged japan to sign a trade agreement. gillard spok
suppression. we're told this is a return to the jim crow laws. well, frankly 80 percent of americans support the total idea pools. the thomas is a high percentage for any issue, even high and another that your humble pie because people are estranged and some people. chieftains of hispanics and african-americans support photo id. in fact, rasmussen asked, they believe and for a is a serious issue? 63 percent of whites said yes and 64 percent of african-americans said gm's. african americans in some places live where a machine controls the political left that the live under. frankly it allows the crime rates to skyrocket. the biggest victim of flow from is minority reformers and veterinarians were political machines control the destiny in the can't fight city of. the mayor of detroit who until recently was serving in public housing after conviction for crimes, he won his second term in part because of a flood of fraudulent ballots. the city clerk cluster job after that. abilene were asking for another florist, a town we could extend free finlandia's to anyone. i believe it's a small number. in
from the law. john: congress killing their funding. so acorn is gone except that they are not on. they just changed shapes. as dan epstein of the taxpayer watchdog group cause of action. what do you mean? >> my organization has been looking at acorn in is reprinted affiliate's of the past year, and we have seen that there are now 1704 groups out there, at least some of which including the mutual housing association of new york here in new york city are getting taxpayer dollars. yet we don't know if they're actually doing anything with that money. john: its new groups. not the same thing. >> the same directors, the same tax i.d. numbers, the same employee edification numbers. in many cases the same employees >> congress cuts them off and they just change names. >> i can tell you that when i were to the house oversight committee as an investigator we went to the inspector general's office, and an auditor told the committee staff when we found direct evidence of acorn housing misusing federal grant money, the auditor said, look, is $10 million. a $10 million grant. when you're deali
, a discussion about google operations and antitrust laws. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called yes, but is it art? i was accused of being a philistia, someone lacking the esthetic ability to appreciate contemporary art. in those 20 years, works that i question worth hundreds of thousands of dollars are now worth hundreds of millions. >> what made everybody so that 20 years ago? >> i discovered something that i had absolutely could barely believe -- that when you question someone's taste in art, thanmore personal politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say you b ought that? > sunday at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. now, an american enterprise institute panel discussion examining whether google is violating antitrust laws. topics included the market for internet search, and an analysis of google's business model. pedal trade commission chairman john leibovitz has said that the ftc plans to make a decision on whether to take legal action against google by the end of this year
dubai which had 110-acre region that had its own legal system that imported british common law "by international financial center which resulted in billions of dollars of capital flowing in and one of the greatest financial centers in the world. john: sharia law. >> except for in the financial center where they realize that by importing bridges, they could actually attract international capital. there is no way they could attract billions of dollars in specifically financial capital in the financial restitutions. so simply very practical and took the best legal system in which to do business, financial business. honduras was going to have the best kind of legal system for creating businesses of all sorts john: you're going to use texas law? >> we are proposing to the perspective under and governor that a default texas legal system without u.s. federal law is pretty good law. most american business people respect and feel comfortable with texas commercial law. many hondurans felt comfortable. separate. the red -- they have to figure out where that is, but it's a good brand globally
individuals who would rather work for those kinds of things that for hedge funds. or go to big law firms who are only going to help hedge funds in order to do it. we've really in the last 32 of 40 years in the united states have created great legal precedent. now we need to get somebody to start applying it. [applause] >> good evening. i am a graduate of as a new law school. i have my professor. >> looking. >> i want to say that i am the american dream. back came more than 25 years ago to the united states of america. and did not have one ballot in my pocket. i had two kids with me in another one in my belly. i went to smu. i raised my. [indiscernible] and the same time. the first one graduated from as a new law school. the second from harvard law school. smu. the second from harvard. the third one from airports academy. this is the glory of united states of america. [applause] also, i came from a communist romania. i leave half of my life in of free land, and i live half of my life under government control. what you presented today, it's not only dangerous for women because this last point
at the school of law since january 1986. she teaches and writes in the area of evidence, constitution law, and women in the law. professor has been named to the mesh law institute and recognized one of the texas top women lawyers. and i also would like to introduce ken lambrecht president and chief executive off of planted parenthood. they are the largest reproductive health care provider in the state and one of the largest in the nation. it's networking of health certainlies merge this fall and they now serve central and north texas including austin, dallas, forth worth, tyler, and waco. planted parenthood have -- each year. planned parenthood in 2005 and brings more than twenty years of leadership experience in the health care industry. finally that brings us our keynote speaker tonight. most of us remember the moment that sandra she testified about seven months ago on the importance of requiring insurance plans to cover con stray seption. the remarks through the radio talk show host rush limbaugh who called her names. but maybe that isn't -- what isn't well known is that mrs. fluke dev
people and some of the authorities thought they could interpret the law to suit their own purposes. that is why the officials signed the documents. it was not until a few years later that they were audited to see if they had violated their own laws. >> with the director is not mentioning is corruption. officials back then issued permits to relatives and friends and just helped themselves. a former mayor approved these houses and had his own construction company build them. officially, the job was noted down as renovating old fisherman's hut that once stood here. >> i do not envy the homeowners. they are innocent and bought the properties in good faith as the third or fourh owners. now they have got to cope with the ruling of the cour their houses will be torn down. >> the enterprising mayor has long since died and cannot be brought to justice. the other corrupt officials are no longer in office. when a legal structure has already been torn down -- a wealthy latvian build a grand new summer residence for himself on an existing foundation right next door to the former summer home of
. >> it is a decision women will be delighted about across botswana. according to the law, women and girls are not allowed to inherit property. this left them at the mercy of male relatives. many lost the rights to any prop.. did judge of the high court hearing says law had no place in modern society. >> we very much welcomed the ruling. i think it is a huge step forward, not only in botswana, but throughout the southern half of the region. it is not just botswana that has these discriminatory laws. it is other countries like malawi. this sends a signal hopefully to the region that these kinds of discriminatory laws should no understand. >> discrimination against women exists in many african societies. in uganda, legally married wives are entitled to 15% of the state, with only 1% going to the customary air. the rest goes to the children. in nigeria, the constitution guarantees equality for women. however, women tend to lose property inheritance rights. the ruling in today's case highlights the broader issue of women's rights in africa and there will be many across the continent who will b
the exploding debt, and at's health care law, same issues that help take the house back then. two key tea parties on same message will help republicans take senate back, americans for prosperity jenniffer sophano. >> if you didn't like the way that government was treating you as a citizen two years ago you must hate it now. 4 years of living under policies of barack obama have been devastating to americans, our families and our children's future, we have proof now, we're not talking about barack obama the man but the president and his policies could we are talking on the issues we can win on this. liz: katherina? >> you know the message still resonates, we need to remind people, people did not support obamacare before they passed, now that it is passed. we do not want it. and it the democrat party who single handedly are issuing largest tax hikes on middle class then we'll see in our life time. liz: talk about the new rasmussen survey with 54% of likely voters favors the repeal of the health care reform bill, what do you make of that? >> the number who want it repealed is low, if you look
this old house and senate which is unrepresentative with the what the country has just voted making laws you know that are contrary to what the new house and senate are going to do? i think most likely for all the fears and lord knows we will cover it on cable news, of a fiscal cliff my guess is just that they will put it off. >> and we do see the likelihood of a deal to make a deal as they are saying but there are two complications to that. there is one incentive for the markets day by day and there will be a lot of incentive to reassure the markets but the two, the two impediments to that, one the white house intends to play real hardball. they feel by putting it off, they loose their leverage and they do not plan to just extend all that, punk all that. there is going to be a fighter for that and second of president obama wins, paul ryan is going to be back in the house. he probably will be running for president in 2016. if paul ryan is back and running for president he is not going to want to make a deal that sees raising revenue, raising taxes and the conservatives will listen to him
might address that gap. [laughter] there are six products of harvard law school and three products of yale law school on the supreme court. there are apparently no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. no, it is a bizarre and unfortunately fact, i think. but those are, i hope, interesting facts about the supreme court. but frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact. about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if be there's a takeaway here, i have gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and they're supposed to look, you know, it's supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same, but just as on the other side of first street the united states congress is deeply divided according to party, so is the united states
law even one that must seem in our short-term interest to do so because of a long-term the goals of those who think international law means anything are those who want to restrain the united states. this is another adviser to gov. romney. i say this not to make a partisan statement, but to say it is different. we spent years and enter the bush years talking about an imperial role for the united states. empire means you have a power about the role. it makes rules for everybody else. that is just not what this world is of central my view. it will never work. i think within a united states that can solve its domestic problems and recapture a sense that it is an example worth emulating, there is -- although they are not nearly as strong as we would like them to be, there is health and strength in the multinational system. >> to talk a lot about continuity. if he set aside the past 50 years, the longest extended continuous strain in the international outlook, staying out of the world. it was looking after our own problems. it is taking advantage of the fact that the atlantic and the p
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
't need sharia in the constitution. he has everything he needs in the laws of the united states, because i see them being in great continuity. and for instance, the law, the press law of 1975 is enough to implement any anti-blasphemy laws, for instance. you don't need to implement sharia to go against blasphemy, or even to constraint expression public, freedom of expression. so in a way i'm optimistic, of course, about tunisia but cautiously optimistic. because i think what you see there is the continuity of the old state. it doesn't seem that there are any intentions to change the institutions of the old state. which, in fact, are very useful for both tunis and another to reshape society for tunis and a modernist direction, and for another in an islamist one. so i will stop here, and i look forward to our discussions. thank you spent thank you very much, malika. that was a model, superb analysis and remedy at the same thing. i also have a sign here that says please continue. i'm not exactly what i use that particular sign. but i'm trying to figure that out. it's rather intimidating. gina,
because labor rolls -- rules. it is the epa and the laws. >> regulation. >> it is not just uncertainty. it is fear of the worst-case scenario coming down the pike. the worst-case scenario is that you do not do with this and their unbalanced tax system. you let the regulatory regime continue to squelch entrepreneurs. you don't take seriously our long-term energy needs and demands and create an affordable and reliable supply of north american energy. >> you fly right off the fiscal cliff. >> it was a shocking experience for a lot of people to go back a few months. the first time we hit the debt ceiling, all the seven whether you were a lender or somebody here who is proud of the way this country had managed to fair, all the sudden policy makers are running right at to the edge. you cannot pay your bills. there is nobody in business that would be allowed to walk away like that. what we're saying is that people in charge of both parties said it takes leadership and the execs -- in the executive branch. it takes leadership. the decisions have to be made. i see governors in both parties have
rights, equal citizenship, under the law. we have a mission. we must call for this spirit. more than ever before there is an urgency now. some folks might be wary because the road to freedom has never been an easy one. some folks have scars on their backs. some folks have been that still aches in their soul. we cannot stop. james baldwin said that human history is a perpetual testament to the achievement of the impossible dream of america must drive us forward. we must not fail now. when other people want to drive us, we must be the hope. when people drive us to doubt, we must be the fate. i learned this from my family and my parents and my grandparents that one folks tried to tell you if you are lesser when one person stand up straight and strong, and they lived an entire nation. [applause] when one person defiantly refuses to be relegated to second class, we are all elevated. this is what everybody must understand. you cannot deny the right of freedom and liberty of others without diminishing your own. this is what we must understand. what king said from a jail cell rings true for all o
point it will go too far. some of these are laws written in basel. they are written for other people and other purposes. they say we have to have a common ground and make it fair for everyone. i agree with that concept except that it's bad for america. if we're not going to do it, the rest of the world cannot make us. >> what about the poster issue of proprietary trading, the volcker rule, all of that? where did you come out on that? >> after dodd-frank, the blueprint, the white paper, and never went through in their two cents, i would argue that was completely unnecessary. it was not the problem. we supported a lot of dodd- frank. you are either for or against it. there are like 2000 things in dodd-frank. the volcker rule had anything to do with the crisis. it is something that he felt deeply about. keep trading safe for big financial companies? i agree. we need to get rid of too big to fail. i agree with the intent. we do not do any crop trading. we have the widest, deepest, most transparent capital market in the world. that's not throw the baby out with the bathwater. the struggle
of them think that i'm a fat person and say that we should pass laws preventing this kind of obesity, and create ways to federally subsidize weight-loss programs. who do they blame? they blame mcdonald's. why is that? because they sell delicious and fattening cheeseburgers and fries along with salads and mcnuggets an awful lot of other things, even the beloved happy meal is under assault. under assault by politicians all around the country and by some who call themselves scientists. one group of the very official sounding name, the center for science in the public interest, threatened to sue mcdonald's if they did not stop serving happy meals. they equated what mcdonald's was doing was child abuse and even worse, equated to child molestation. stephen gardner said in a prepared statement, he said it is a creepy and predatory practice that warrants an injunction. let's face it, it was gardner's statement that sounded creepy. the fact is that liberals hate mcdonald's and its competitors because they symbolize everything about america that they load. our entrepreneurial zero, a level of
to agree with you with their level of investments. >> second row on the side. >> after rule of law committee for the oceans, in the mid century, nicholas said geography was one of the most important factors in foreign affairs because it was the most permanent. this year we just saw the arctic icecap dropped another 750,000 square kilometers and appears to be opening more this session. what do you think this trend will mean not next year or even next decade but in a generation as that becomes more open for russia and canada in particular. >> nicholas pikeman is someone i devote a whole chapter to in this book because he is very provocative and here is the man who when it was unclear that china where defeat japan, predicted that china who is our ally at the time would become our adversary for geographical reasons and also said when europe was fighting for its life against germany, united europe could be a competitor for the united states. she was very clear volume. in terms of the arctic icecap, this is playing out over decades. if you had an arctic open for shipping and a close frie
correspondent mike emanuel. >> the law says mass layoffs are coming, notices should go out 60 days ahead. obama administration that isn't necessary since many are hoping a deal will be struck to avoid the cuts. even so, a ceo i talked to he will be up front with his employees. >> it makes it challenging. people come to work. we've got some of the best people in the country working for us. they come every day, they want to design the best systems that our fighters need, but it's challenging. when they sit around kitchen table at night. honey, what is going to happen? it's tough because they don't know. >> reporter: obama administration is telling contractors if they get sued for not sending out layoff notices the government will pick up the tack. lockheed martin will hold off telling workers, but two kron man sent a letter saying quote, should you rely on that guidance and fail to comply with the warren acted requirement, will you be setting up your company for serious legal and financial reprosper cushions. graham sounds pretty upset. >> in 2007, senator obama wanted to extend the notice requir
significant to link them. his support for lincoln's policies are very important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her
for various types of reforms for the drug laws and drug enforcement. i think that the -- one of the contexts that's so important here and people so often lose sight of is that this bill, 1506, is a small effort in the state of california and in the country of the united states to try to roll back the horrendous rates of incarceration that have happened in this country over the last 30 years. i mean, that's the context, right? the united states, i think most of you know these numbers now, but we're less than 5% of the world's population but almost 25% of the world's incarcerated population. we rank first in the world in the per capita incarceration of our fellow citizens. the russians are fading fast in second or third place together with the belarus people. the rates of the incarceration are five, six, seven, eight times than most in other societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative t
-- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] po
are your thoughts? >> caller: i just think it's unfortunate that today we need this kind of law we. look at the ayaan to leave the unemployment rate on its higher among black and it is white, so there's still discrimination going on in this country, and we still need this law. it's really unfortunate. >> host: will be in jacksonville florida, independent. your thoughts are next, willie. >> caller: yes, good morning. it must not be enough highly educated black institutions say i have to go to harvard to get a certain education. we don't have -- we reached the same criteria. we are still lacking and i get an education at the school. i just don't understand. they have no qualified school that is on the same level with these schools and professors on the same level. uc-irvine saying? >> host: here is the 28 president of the university of texas at austin writing in today's wall street journal traer. he writes history repeats itself when they are in an ironic way the university of texas goes before the supreme court to defend the missions. it lasted 62 years ago when he men's white and african
in the area. police are not saying who found the body but interest has been a massive law enforcement search of 1000 people when she went missing on friday. jessica was seen by her mother leaving for school about a mile away. she never made it to school or nearby park where she normally meets up with friends and walks the rest of the way to school. this is a very beautiful, vivacious, beautiful little girl, outgoing. there has been a massive search for her ever since she went missing on friday. alisyn? alisyn: dan, maybe you can confirm, police are saying that the parents are not suspects. are there any leads? >> reporter: that's right. we can confirm that and the police had a news conference yesterday in the afternoon several hours before the body was discovered and they cleared the parents essentially. they said they are not suspects and that they are believing that this was an abduction. now far as leads, we can say jessica's backpack was found and a water bottle found in a neighborhood on a sidewalk six miles away from her house. the cops are also looking at possible link to an abduction
is this white house advising defense contractors to ignore a law requiring them to send layoff notices to their employees? chief congressional correspondent, mike emanuel live in washington with that. >> reporter: many involved in national security hope congress and the president will work out a deal after the election to avoid these cuts which defense secretary panetta said would be devastating but a law called the warren act, if you expect a mass layoff of employees you need to give them 60 days notice and one contractor co-says the uncertainty is rough. ? the frustration, we say what should we tell our people and it is akin to being in a car and, all of a sudden you find you are playing chicken and have your company in there and they are saying to you, if we go over the cliff we'll help you out, providing you don't tell the folks that they are in the car with us. >> reporter: the obama administration tells contractors they don't need to send out layoff notices days before the election, and if they get sued for ignoring the law the government will pay their expenses and lockheed mart
ruling. >> the current law will end months of legal uncertainty for parents, doctors, and religious officials who carry out the procedure. the justice ministry says it will safeguard religious rites while guaranteeing children's safety. >> i think with this bill, we are making it clear that jews and muslims will be able to continue their religious practices in germany. as long as they are compatible with certain regulations. >> the bill introduces new coke -- new conditions, allowing ritual male circumcision, only when the operation adheres to medical procedures. it can only be carried out when the child is not in danger, and parents must be informed about the risk. religious groups say they are happy with the bill, especially as it allows non-doctors to carry out the procedure on children up to six months old, but some pediatricians oppose the new law. >> such an operation should be delayed until the boy is a young adult and old enough to decide whether he wants to have it carried out or not. >> for many jews, this would be unthinkable. according to religious tradition, boys must b
a book that teaches us a law -- a lot. it forces us to look at china in a different way. >> mo yan has been criticized for being too close to the chinese communist party. more discussion is sure to follow. >> that is the purpose of the nobel prize. whether you agree with the nobel committee or not, the prize is guaranteed to raise awareness of the author. >> up to now, his books have not found a large audience in germany, but in frankfurt, that already looks certain to change. >> our cultural affairs correspondent has been following the announcement from the frankfurt book fair, and i asked by the swedish academy decided to honor mo yan. >> the obvious question is whether the price comes with a political message from sweden to beijing. it is difficult to answer that. it is a difficult question because mo yan is certainly not a dissident like a man who get the peace prize a couple of years ago. he is even a member of the communist party of china and has been that for many years, but he is not a party soldier at all. he has even been banned at times. some of his books were not available
but they encouraged that everybody would vote. now understand that under the new voter i.d. laws, i was told that in some cases, they are shifting id's from people who don't have an expiration date. i retired in 1991 and i have had the same id card for 21 years. guest: sergeant major, thank you for your service. i served on active duty the same time you did. i retired in 2004 and i joined in 1984. i am revealing my age now -- there are voting assistance officers on every duty station. if you are working in the battalion headquarters or company headquarters, you might be aware of who that is. i was a logistics marine which meant i was driving a tractor trailers, served the infantry, hold all over the state of california or in open now, japan and did massive field time. i had no awareness of who the voting assistance officer was, what my deadlines were to get registered to vote. there was no awareness or training. i think everybody and acted to the can agree that there are opportunities in the military to do mandatory training. everybody knows taxes are due on april 15. we set up tax centers o
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the definition be changed. it was, we succeeded. mrs. mrs. mrs. has always been ahead of the main stream news when it comes to coverage of women and girls. "ms." first sounded the alarm about the war on women eight years ago. behind me you'll recognize the cover of "ms.," wonder woman fighting for peace and justice. for our 40th anniversary we wanted to feature this iconic super hero with women marching to stop the attacks
on these matters. i do like virginia's laws based on freedom and disclosure. and if there was more freedom, more of the contributions would come to the campaigns. what i would like to see in any ads that are run, whether run by candidates or independent groups, including the ones that are running negative ads that are false and misleading about me, is honesty. tim has brought up this issue of pay. and he's running these ads saying that, quote, he's setting a positive example by cutting his pay as governor. and he attacks the owner. attacked me today again on it. let me give you the truthful facts and you be the judge. as governor day one i returned 10% of my salary. all four years. mark warner followed up after me a few years later and cut his by 20%. what did tim do? he didn't cut his pay at all. when he came in, he could have found followed mark warner or my example but it was well into second year as governor he cut it by just 5%. so i was the one who actually set the positive example, tim, that you followed by you did do it half heartedly. and as far as in the senate, in the senate i returne
worse. but don't dismiss the old framework lightly. credit for the 1986 reform law belongs to democrats like bill bradley in the senate. just as much as to president reagan. as a member of the house back then, i not only voted for it, but i whipped the votes to make sure it passed. i was on the committee set up by dan rostenkowski to get it done. the approach made a good deal of sense at the time. then, as now, the code was littered with egregious loopholes that needed to be reformed. recall the so-called passive law schools that were in place back then. they allowed wealthy taxpayers to gain the system. someone could invest in a bowling alley and then, if the bowling alley lost money, they could take a write off many times larger than their initial money incestment of their entire income tax liability. we need to get rid of such a gimmicky tax shelter. paring these loopholes allowed us to cut rates. at the time, that made sense, too. while it is critically important to insure that everyone, especially those at the top pay their fair share, 50% of the top federal tax rate is what we had
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